Majolica Teapots

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Le Souk Ceramique Malika Design Teapot

by Le Souk Ceramique
Price: $42.82 Buy Now

Features:
  • We currently make 33 different shapes and sizes and paint our designs in all these same 33 options
  • Dishwasher-safe and microwave-safe (though not for use with oven, stovetop or freezer)
  • The Le Souk Ceramique studio is located in Nabeul

Product description

Nejma means "star" in Arabic. Wanting to create a design with the predominant color being a bright red with a geometric basis, what resulted is the most intricate and difficult design we have ever made but certainly worth the effort. Sit back and imagine a heavenly table set sumptuously with Nejma and appreciate the freehand painting by our stars, the artists of Le Souk Ceramique. The Le Souk Ceramique studio is located in Nabeul, Tunisia on the Mediterranean coast with US headquarters and distribution in Clinton, Washington State.



Le Souk Ceramique Malika Design Teapot

by Le Souk Ceramique
List price: $47.81 Price: $41.96 Buy Now

Features:
  • We currently make 33 different shapes and sizes and paint our designs in all these same 33 options
  • Dishwasher-safe and microwave-safe (though not for use with oven, stovetop or freezer)
  • Hand Painted (truly 100% free hand) using only food safe paints and glazes

Product description

Nejma means "star" in Arabic. Wanting to create a design with the predominant color being a bright red with a geometric basis, what resulted is the most intricate and difficult design we have ever made but certainly worth the effort. Sit back and imagine a heavenly table set sumptuously with Nejma and appreciate the freehand painting by our stars, the artists of Le Souk Ceramique. The Le Souk Ceramique studio is located in Nabeul, Tunisia on the Mediterranean coast with US headquarters and distribution in Clinton, Washington State.








News Feed

Fine Majolica at Auction 02/23/15, via Maine Antique Digest

The highest price at the November sale was paid for a Minton majolica turquoise-ground teapot modeled as a flat iron with a frieze of mice around the sides and a large white cat wrapped around the handle looking down at a mouse holding a carrot. It

Telegraph.co.uk

Treasured Possessions, Fitzwiliam Museum, review: 'genuinely original' 04/13/15, via Telegraph.co.uk

And so, as herbs and spices from America and the Far East began to be sold in large quantities in 16th century Europe, apothecaries presented their wares in wonderfully embellished majolica vessels. To reassure customers that they were getting what

Minton Majolica Glazed Teapot

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPjnKrJkAnw

Minton Majolica Glazed Teapot.

Library

Collectible Teapots

Collectible Teapots

Published by Antique Trader Books 1999

ISBN 1582210187,9781582210186
208 pages

Features nearly 2,000 price listings for collectible teapots, along with historical backgrounds, nation-by-nation explanations of style, pattern and composition, collector's guidelines, manufacturer's marks, and more.

Sites on a related topic



Minton

You could wear fancy dress, or perhaps tell silly jokes, but for somewhat more sublime humour, how about serving the punch in a punchbowl supported on his nose and his knees by Mr Punch himself. Itís made from majolica, a type of colourful lead-glazed earthenware pottery popular in the mid-19th century, by one of its leading exponents, George Jones. Inebriated Mr Punch was just one example. Imagine sitting down to dinner with rabbit stew on the menu and being served from a dish decorated with the heads of two very irate rabbits. Or nuts from a dish with a squirrel sitting in the centre. or sardines revealed by lifting a lid shaped like one. Majolica mirth even went as far as to poke fun at Charles Darwin’s Origin of the Species theory of evolution with teapots and garden seats held by monkeys. Jones may have been its most imaginative potter, but he was not the inventor of majolica. The great Herbert Minton claims that innovation. Ironically Jones had been one of the master’s apprentices. Maiolica with an i, on the other hand had been around since the 15th century, most notably in Renaissance Italy. Inspired by the brightly coloured pottery being imported from Spain, Italian potters, notably the Della Robbia family of sculptors, attempted to copy it. They called it after the medieval Italian for Majorca. Sixteenth century French eccentric Bernard Palissy potted a series of some of the most extraordinary pieces in which creatures like colourful fish, snakes and lizards appear in scarily realistic three-dimensional reliefs. The bizarre pieces were Minton’s inspiration. He exhibited his new pottery at the Great Exhibition of 1851, under the name Palissy ware. Visitors loved it and the display won a medal for Minton and orders from Queen Victoria. Its popularity was assured and the factory was sole manufacturer for the next 15 years. The name was less successful, so it was re-christened Majolica. The man Herbert Minton had to thank for his medal was his talented French art director Leon Arnoux. The son of a pottery manufacturer, Arnoux had joined Minton in Stoke-on-Trent the year before and was largely responsible for the experimental work on new lead glazing. He was also successful in attracting a string of European sculptors and designers whose talents kept the company streets ahead of their competitors. At the Paris Exhibition of 1878, one commentator said of Minton: ‘No other manufacturer had surpassed them in the sharpness of details, purity of colour and excellence of glaze. ’ By then, few Victorian homes were without a piece either in the garden, the conservatory or on the dinner table. Wedgwood produced imitation majolica from 1860, using a white earthenware body, unlike Minton's which was a yellow cane colour, while the relief ornament was painted with transparent coloured glazes. Other potters making majolica included Daniel Sutherland and Sons and Moore Brothers, both of Longton. James Woodward of Swadlincote, although Jones proved to be the most successful. Having trained at Minton, Jones worked as a wholesaler from 1844 to 1862, first for Minton and then for many others in the Potteries, before establishing his own Trent Pottery in 1861. A devastating fire in 1866 almost put him out of business but... Not surprisingly, his whimsical products were well received by the buying public ñ not that it went down well with Minton and Wedgwood, his main competitors. His wares can often be singled out by looking for an impressed ‘G J’ monogram which changed after 1873 to include ‘& Sons’. The beginning of the end for majolica came after numerous small pot banks began to flood the market with similar but cheap, mass-produced ware. Recession hit the Staffordshire Potteries in the early 1880s and Jones ceased production in 1886, the 20-year lifespan of his majolica adding its cachet among today’s collectors. However, place one of the cheap and nasty pieces alongside one from the Jones factory and the difference in quality is easy to spot. Search out jugs shaped like logs or the stumps of trees. game pie dishes like the one with rabbits' heads - others feature ducks, foxes and pigeons - or whimsical bits and bobs like teapots, strawberry and sardine dishes that'll keep you.

Source: UK Auctioneers

Bing news feed

Fine Majolica at Auction - 10/07/14, via Maine Antique Digest

It may be the only set to survive. Strawser. This important Minton majolica turquoise-ground flat iron teapot has a frieze of mice around the sides and a large white cat wrapped around the handle looking down at a mouse holding a carrot. It sold on the ...

Treasures: Some majolica pieces can be highly prized - 08/10/14, via Reading Eagle

Majolica covered boxes might look like cauliflowers, and a teapot might be shaped like a monkey with coconuts. In the current marketplace, the word majolica has been terribly misused, and we see it applied to ceramic objects that have an opaque glaze but ...

Treasures in Your Attic: Poring over details of an English teapot - 09/25/13, via The Daily Journal

I have this teapot and am curious to know if it has any monetary value ... source says 1886), and in 1892 they built Winton Potteries to make earthenwares, majolica and china. The Grimwade brothers were successful and began acquiring other potteries ...

Directory

  1. TEAPOTS - Majolica MAJOLICA - Charles L. Washburne, specialist antique dealer offering large rotating stock of English Victorian Majolica
  2. majolica teapots | eBay Find great deals on eBay for majolica teapots majolica cheese. Shop with confidence.
  3. majolica teapot | eBay Find great deals on eBay for majolica teapot majolica pitcher. Shop with confidence.
Trouble Brewing
Trouble Brewing
Minton novelty majolica teapot in the shape of a fighting vulture and snake, at the Twining Teapot Gallery, Norwich Castle Museum
Photo by mdavidford on Flickr
Water Spout
Water Spout
Novelty majolica fish teapot, at the Twining Teapot Gallery, Norwich Castle Museum
Photo by mdavidford on Flickr
Lithgow Pottery green majolica vine leaf plate. Ucommon Australian colonial pottery.
Lithgow Pottery green majolica vine leaf plate. Ucommon Australian colonial pottery.
Lithgow Pottery began in the town of Lithgow in the Blue Mountains in 1877 to produce gutter tiles and terracotta pipes for drainage works. It adopted the kangaroo as part of its logo and trade mark. From 1879 the pottery produced decorative flower pots. Quickly the range increased to include table wares, jelly moulds, bread plates, teapots etc. A chane in import duties was the deth knoll for the decorative wares in 1896. Pipes were made until the 1907 when the pottery completely closed. Its decorative pottery is now highly collectible in Australia. The best collection of Lithgow Pottery is in the Eskbank House Museum Collection in Lithgow.
Photo by denisbin on Flickr
Majolica bird on nest teapot - For Sale
Majolica bird on nest teapot - For Sale
Teapot - MAJOLICA TEAPOT by Wardle & Co
Teapot - MAJOLICA TEAPOT by Wardle & Co
Mafra Majolica Palissy snake & cabbage teapot & cover - For Sale
Mafra Majolica Palissy snake & cabbage teapot & cover - For Sale